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Family Member's Interests                Peter - Church Architecture

All Saints, Walesby, Lincolnshire (also known as the Ramblers Church or Old Church)

Click on the photographs for a larger image
All Saints Walesby

All Saints Walesby

North Arcade

North Arcade

South Arcade

South Arcade

Lady Chapel, Stained Glass

Lady Chapel, Stained Glass

All Saints exterior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
High on the Wold overlooking the village of Walesby stands the church of All Saints. Most commentators believe the village once stood alongside the church and was subsequently rebuilt at the foot of the hill. I subscribe to the view that this is an ancient place of Christian worship with at least two former buildings sited on what the Time Team would term ‘a ritual site’. The ‘Ramblers Church’, as it is now more commonly known was abandoned in 1914 when the new church was built in the village centre. Thanks to the restorers in the 1930’s we can still enjoy this beautiful building. It is probably more frequented now than in former days because the Viking Way passes close by providing a welcome sanctuary of rest for weary travellers
The exterior view shows a church of mainly the Early English period (1150-1300) as evidenced by the simple Y tracery windows particularly in the chancel. However the interior is a fascinating transitional mixture of late Norman and Early English. The North arcade (pictured right) has typical Norman round arches resting on solid round columns. The capitals (the top of the column) are carved. One shows a Norman  ‘scallop’ design and another with a ‘stiff leaf acanthus’ design which is typically of the Early English period.  This part of the church was constructed in around 1170-1200. (note also the white painted box pews against the wall)
The picture on the left shows the south arcade, which dates from around 1220. Within a span of fifty years or so we can see a change of style which explains the term ‘transitional’. Here we see the pointed arches, which typify the Early English builders. The octagonal columns seem almost delicate when compared with the solid work in the opposite north arcade. However, delicate is not a word that springs to mind when you note the carved heads on the capital of the pictured centre column. Close inspection shows seemingly very primitive workmanship though they are amusing as they may have been modelled using real people!
In the south aisle is the Lady Chapel. Here we have the stained glass window given to the church in 1952 by The Grimsby & District Wayfarers Association. Simon Jenkins, in his book ‘England’s Thousand Best Churches’, describes this window as ‘insipid’. Insofar as the window gives a flavour of the fifties, particularly in the dress of the hikers I feel it has as much right in the church as do the crude carvings from the 1200’s. To my mind Mr Jenkins is plainly wrong in his assertion. You however must make up your own mind!
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
All Saints interior
Clink on the link to go to my other pages
Church Architecture and Stained Glass
The Creation Window - Chester Cathedral
St Martin's Waithe Lincolnshire
All Saints Walesby Lincolnshire (this page)

© Peter Tappin Jan 2009

peter@tappin-family.org.uk
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