PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

PS Lincoln Castle Jun 2010

Tappin Family Website Copyright  David Tappin (unless otherwise stated)
Family Member's Interests
                                       Stephen - Grimsby in Picture - Paddle Steamer Lincoln Castle                                                   
                                                                                    
                                                                                         and the death of an "Old Lady"
It was the opening of the Humber Bridge in 1981 that spelt the end of the operational life of this fine vessel. It had been moored on the north bank of the Humber for a few years before being purchased for use as a bar and restaurant and it was then moved to Grimsby on the south bank.

After spending 16 years moored near to the Fishing Heritage Centre the Lincoln Castle was temporally moved and beached on an underwater platform in the Alexandra Dock next to the Corporation Road Lift Bridge in March 2006. Here essential works to the hull were to be carried out and, following painting, she was to be returned to her permanent mooring. However, it seems that the work was more extensive than expected particularly to the hull plates and sufficient finance was not available. She was painted externally but all other work came to a halt.

Click on pictures for a larger image.
PS Lincoln Castle in Alexandra Dock, Grimsby

PS Lincoln Castle in Alexandra Dock, Grimsby

The Paddle Steamer Lincoln Castle was moored in the Alexandra Dock in Grimsby near to the National Fishing Heritage Centre in 1989 and was then successfully used as a floating bar and restaurant. Originally built in 1940 at Glasgow, she was 208 feet in length and 598 gross tonnes and was used along with two others as a ferry on the New Holland, Lincolnshire to Hull, Yorkshire crossing of the River Humber. When withdrawn she held the distinction of being the last operational coal fired paddle steamer in the UK.

The Lincoln Castle operated the New Holland to Hull route with the PS Tattershall Castle (built 1934, withdrawn 1972 and now a floating bar on the River Thames) and with the PS Wingfield Castle (built 1934, withdrawn 1974 and now a floating museum exhibit in Hartlepool).



Being prepared to move with the gangway removed
   


On the move after 16 years albeit not of course under her own steam!



Beached on a temporary underwater platform alongside the Corporation Rd Lift Bridge.
   


Painting in progress on the port side.



Painting in progress on the starboard side
   


Bows moored just a few feet away from the Corporation Road Lift Bridge
Ready to Move
On the Move
Beached on a platform
Painting Port Side
Painting Starboard Side
Bows feet away from the Lift Bridge
30 March 2006 - On the move

© Stephen Tappin Jun 2011

stephen@tappin-family.org.uk
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Contact me david@tappin-family.org.uk
   
June 2010 - an update

After 4 years of sitting on its temporary platform, PS Lincoln Castle is up for sale, the Owners having had to admit defeat not being able to come up with the finance for the extensive repairs to its bottom plates. It is up for sale at just 20,000 but North East Lincs Council (owners of the mooring) want buyers to put up a further 60,000 bond in case the vessel is abandoned in the future. The Paddle Steamer Preservation Society have also been offered the vessel but have declined to take it on because of the costs involved.

A local businessman has stepped forward and has shown strong interest but to date it remains unclear if he can come up with the necessary finance for the purchase and the bond, there are also conflicting reports on the cost of repairs quoted as between 250,000 and 1,000,000. The future does not look good! 

The Lincoln Castle Preservation Society has been formed to try to buy the ship for restoration.
 
The Death of an Old Lady


   


       
       
18 Sep 2010

18 Sep 2010

18 Sep 2010

18 Sep 2010

18 Sep 2010

18 Sep 2010

28 Sep 2010

28 Sep 2010

28 Sep 2010

28 Sep 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

7 Oct 2010

Sep 2010 - an update

All negotiations with the Owner have broken down (if they ever really started) and controversially dismantling work has started, last minute efforts are made to purchase the Lincoln Castle by the Preservation Society but this also fails. Bit by bit she is torn apart. Incredibly, it seems that the Lincoln Castle Preservation Society intends to build another "Lincoln Castle" from the original plans. "Watch this space?" Maybe not.

Much more detail can be found here http://paddlesteamers.awardspace.com/LincolnCastle.htm
Demolition work started in Setemberr 2010 and was completed in October 2010 - the end of an era.
From this -----

From this -----

to this - 20 Oct 2010

to this - 20 Oct 2010